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Rensselaer to Host Workshop on Pervasive Computing and Networking

April 26, 2004

"Anytime, Anywhere" computing will be the focus of a "Workshop on Pervasive Computing and Networking" at Rensselaer this week. Scores of leading-edge researchers are coming to campus April 29 and 30 for the event, sponsored by the National Science Foundation and the Rensselaer Center for Pervasive Computing and Networking.

The workshop features sessions on many of the key issues and emerging technologies that will shape next-generation computing.

William "Bud" Baeslack '78, dean of Rensselaer's School of Engineering, will open the workshop, which will follow with presentations by distinguished researchers from many of the nation's top academic and industry centers for pervasive computing and networking. Rensselaer researchers will chair the sessions.

The program will cover both theoretical and applied research areas in the field, including computing architectures, security, sensors and sensor networks, wireless and mobile computing, embedded systems, context awareness, and coordination models.

"We want to cover the state of the art," said Bolek Szymanski, Rensselaer professor of computer science and chair of the Center for Pervasive Computing and Networking.


The program will cover both theoretical and applied research areas in the field, including computing architectures, security, sensors and sensor networks, wireless and mobile computing, embedded systems, context awareness, and coordination models.


The workshop also includes a panel session on strategic directions in funding to provide participants with an overview of government and industry priorities.

With the rapid advance of computing technology, practitioners of pervasive networks are able to focus on paradigm-changing applications, such as wireless connections between remote sensors, but much work remains to be done-on scalability and integration, energy, security, and other issues-to bring these future networks to life, said Bulent Yener, associate professor of computer science at Rensselaer and workshop chair.

"Our center at Rensselaer focuses on the challenges of integration, scalability, and integrating the fundamental disciplines of pervasive computing," added Szymanski.

"The workshop will provide an informal atmosphere so that researchers can bring their ideas, discuss them, and get critical input to take them further," said Szymanski. "Professor Yener and I will edit a book based on the workshop presentations. It will support ongoing dialogue within the pervasive computing community."

To find out more about the Rensselaer Center for Pervasive Computing and Networking, go to http://www.rpi.edu/cpcn/.

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