Seventh International Workshop on Computational Social Choice (COMSOC-2018)

Troy, NY, USA, 25-27 June 2018

About COMSOC-2018

Computational social choice is a rapidly growing discipline at the interface of social choice theory and computer science. It is concerned with the application of computational techniques to the study of social choice mechanisms, and with the integration of social choice paradigms into computing (Read more).

The Seventh International Workshop on Computational Social Choice (COMSOC-2018) will take place on June 25–27, 2018, in Troy, NY, USA. It will be hosted by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI). The aim of the workshop is to bring together different communities: computer scientists interested in computational issues in social choice; people working in artificial intelligence and multiagent systems who are using ideas from social choice to organize societies of artificial software agents; logicians interested in the logic-based specification and analysis of social procedures; computer science theorists analyzing algorithmic properties of social phenomena; and last but not least people coming from social choice theory itself: economists, mathematicians, and political scientists.

News

  • Registration is open, see here. Early registration until June 1.

  • Accepted papers are updated, camera ready due: April 30, 2018

  • Poster submission deadline April 30, 2018. To submit, please sent the title and abstract of the poster (up to 250 words) by email to comsoc2018.rpi@gmail.com, with the subject "COMSOC-18 poster submission",

Open Poster Session Submission

COMSOC-2018 will include a open poster session. Posters will be selected based on abstracts. Unlike regular submissions, they will not be reviewed by the program committee. Posters will be selected based on abstracts of up to 250 words, which can be sent by email to comsoc2018.rpi@gmail.com, with the subject "COMSOC-18 poster submission", anytime until April 30, 2018.

Paper Submission and Camera Ready

The camera-ready version of accepted papers can be uploaded on the Easychair submission webpage, following the same requirements for submission as detailed below.

Regular papers should not exceed 12 pages in length, excluding references, contact information and a clearly-marked appendix of arbitrary length that will be read at the discretion of the PC members. When preparing your submission, please follow these formatting instructions. The easiest way of doing so is to use the Latex typesetting system with the class file comsoc2018.cls. The formatting instructions are based on a sample file (comsoc18.tex), which you can use as a starting point for your own paper.

You will be able to revise your submission any number of times before the deadline (March 1st, anywhere in the world).

All submitted papers will be reviewed by the program committee. Accepted papers will be collected in informal workshop notes that will not be printed. To accomodate the publishing needs of different scientific communities, we stress that authors will retain the copyright of their papers and that submitting to COMSOC-2018 does not preclude publication of the same material in a journal or in a conference with formal proceedings.

Submission of regular papers is restricted by the rule that a single person can present at most one paper at the workshop.

Call for Papers: Seventh International Workshop on Computational Social Choice (COMSOC-2018)

Troy, NY, USA, June 25--27, 2018

Webpage: www.cs.rpi.edu/~xial/COMSOC18

Mission

Computational social choice is a rapidly growing discipline at the interface of social choice theory and computer science. It is concerned with the application of computational techniques to the study of social choice mechanisms, and with the integration of social choice paradigms into computing. The aim of the workshop is to bring together different communities: computer scientists interested in computational issues in social choice; people working in artificial intelligence and multiagent systems who are using ideas from social choice to organize societies of artificial software agents; logicians interested in the logic-based specification and analysis of social procedures; and last but not least, researchers coming from social choice theory itself: economists, mathematicians and computer scientists.

Paper submission

Submissions of papers describing original, under review, or recently published work on all aspects of computational social choice are invited. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to computational issues that arise in the analysis of

  • Preference elicitation

  • Preference representation languages

  • Restricted preference domains

  • Voting rules

    • axiomatic properties

    • manipulation, control and bribery

    • voting equilibria and dynamics

  • Judgement aggregation

  • Fair division and allocation

  • Matching and coalition formation

  • Opinion diffusion and aggregation on social networks

  • Recommendation systems

  • Software for collective decision-making

We welcome both theoretical and empirical work on these topics, including, in particular, research on algorithms (exact, approximate, parameterized, online and distributed), learning, logic, uncertainty and simulations in the context of social choice.

Papers will have to be submitted electronically via Easychair. All submitted papers will be reviewed by the program committee. Accepted papers will be collected in informal workshop notes; however, the workshop has no formal proceedings and the authors retain their copyright. Each accepted paper will have to be presented by one of the authors, with the constraint that each workshop participant gives at most one talk (exceptions can be made due to unforeseen circumstances).

COMSOC-2018 will also include a poster session. Posters will be selected based on abstracts. Unlike regular submissions, they will not be reviewed by the program committee; the intention is to accept all posters that fall within the scope of the workshop subject to space constraints. Posters will be selected based on abstracts of up to 250 words, which can be sent by email to comsoc2018.rpi@gmail.com, with the subject "COMSOC-18 poster submission", anytime until April 30, 2018.

Please contact either one of the program chairs in case of any questions:

  • Edith Elkind (elkind@cs.ox.ac.uk)

  • Lirong Xia (xialirong@gmail.com)

IMPORTANT DATES

  • Paper submission deadline: March 1, 2018

  • Notification of authors: April 4, 2018

  • Poster submission deadline: April 30, 2018

  • Camera ready due: April 30, 2018

  • Workshop dates: June 25-27, 2018

Invited Speakers


David Chaum,

CEO of Privategrity and inventor of Random Sample Voting


Ashish Goel,

Professor, MS&E, Stanford University


E. Glen Weyl

Principal Researcher, Microsoft Research New England

Title: Radical Markets and Quadratic Voting

Abstract. In a new book with Eric Posner, Radical Markets: Uprooting Capitalism and Democracy for a Just Society, we argue that markets can be a radically egalitarian and emancipatory force, but only if they are freed from the shackles of conventional institutions such as private property, which is inherently monopolistic, and one-person-one-vote, which prevents market trade. In this talk I will present the basic paradigm of Radical Markets with a focus on Quadratic Voting (QV), an efficient market alternatives to one-person-one-vote, and the ways we have tried to operationalize it in practice. I will also highlight a range of open computational social choice problems around QV. Overall, my message is that by thinking bigger and bolder, computational social choice can be a force for social transformation and contribute importantly to the solution of our most pressing social crises: rising inequality, stagnating economies and increasing political tensions.

Bio. E. (Eric) Glen Weyl is a Principal Researcher at Microsoft Research New York City and a Visiting Research Scholar at Princeton University’s economics department. His work combines insights from economics, law, philosophy, computer science, political science, history and sociology radically expand the scope of market institutions so as to increase broadly shared prosperity and resolve social conflicts. His recent book with his most common collaborator, Eric Posner, Radical Markets: Uprooting Capitalism and Democracy for a Just Society ties together much of his work on these themes. He also works to put these ideas into practice through working with policymakers and through entrepreneurship, including his start-up Collective Decision Engines commercializing a Pareto-efficient voting technique he invented, Quadratic Voting.

Accepted Papers (Oral and Poster)

  • Zack Fitzsimmons and Edith Hemaspaandra. High-Multiplicity Election Problems
  • Takashi Kurihara. Leximax and leximin extension rules for ranking sets as final outcomes with null alternatives
  • Umberto Grandi, Sirin Botan and Laurent Perrussel. Multi-Issue Opinion Diffusion under Constraints
  • Martin Lackner and Piotr Skowron. A Quantitative Analysis of Multi-Winner Rules
  • Hongyao MaReshef Meir and David C. Parkes. Social Choice with Non Quasi-linear Utilities
  • Alex Carver and Paolo Turrini. Peer reviewing and manipulation under uncertainty
  • Erel Segal-Halevi and Warut Suksompong. Democratic Fair Allocation of Indivisible Goods
  • Omer Lev and Yoad Lewenberg. "Reverse Gerrymandering'': a Decentralized Model for Multi-Group Decision Making
  • Hanrui ZhangYu Cheng and Vincent Conitzer. A Better Algorithm for Societal Tradeoffs
  • Allan BorodinOmer LevNisarg Shah and Tyrone Strangway. Big City vs. the Great Outdoors: Voter Distribution and How it Affects Gerrymandering
  • Nawal BenabbouMithun ChakrabortyXuan-Vinh Ho, Jakub Sliwinski and Yair Zick. The Assignment Problem with Diversity Constraints with an application to Ethnic Integration in Public Housing
  • Moshe Mash, Yoram Bachrach, Kobi Gal and Yair Zick. How to Form Winning Coalitions in Mixed Human-Computer Settings
  • Ta Duy Nguyen and Yair Zick. Resource Based Cooperative Games: Optimization, Fairness and Stability
  • Umberto Grandi, James Stewart and Paolo Turrini. Personalised Rating
  • Akihiro Kawana and Tomomi Matsui. Trading Transforms of Non-weighted Simple Games and Integer Weights of Weighted Simple Games
  • Hadi Hosseini and Kate Larson. Strategyproof Quota Mechanisms for Multiple Assignment Problems
  • Piotr Faliszewski, Stanisław Szufa and Nimrod Talmon. Optimization-Based Voting Rule Design: The Closer to Utopia the Better
  • Rupert FreemanSeyed Majid ZahediVincent Conitzer and Benjamin C Lee. Dynamic Proportional Sharing: A Game-Theoretic Approach
  • Po-Ting Ling, Hung-Lung Wang and Kun-Mao Chao. Determining a social choice with respect to linear preferences
  • Arianna Novaro, Umberto Grandi, Dominique Longin and Emiliano Lorini. Goal-Based Collective Decisions: Axiomatics and Computational Complexity
  • Sefi Erlich, Noam Hazon and Sarit Kraus. Negotiation Strategies for Agents with Ordinal Preferences
  • Kazunori Ota, Nathanaël Barrot, Yuko Sakurai and Makoto Yokoo. Impact of the Number of Neutrals on Stability Concepts in Friends Oriented Hedonic Games
  • Felix Brandt, Johannes Hofbauer and Martin Strobel. Exploring the No-Show Paradox for Condorcet Extensions Using Ehrhart Theory and Computer Simulations
  • James Bailey and Craig Tovey. The Price of Deception in Spatial Social Choice
  • Marc Neveling and Jörg Rothe. Closing the gap of control complexity in Borda elections: Solving twelve open cases
  • Aleksei Kondratev and Alexander Nesterov. Random Paths To Popularity In Two-Sided Matching
  • Aleksei Kondratev and Alexander Nesterov. Weak Mutual Majority Criterion for Voting Rules
  • Sebastian Frederik Schneckenburger and Justin Kruger. Fall if it lifts your teammate: a novel type of candidate manipulation
  • Benno Kuckuck and Jörg Rothe. Sequential Allocation Rules are Separable: Refuting a Conjecture on Scoring-Based Allocation of Indivisible Goods
  • Zoi TerzopoulouUlle Endriss and Ronald de Haan. Aggregating Incomplete Judgments: Axiomatisations for Scoring Rules
  • Gal Cohensius, Omer Ben Porat, Reshef Meir and Ofra Amir. Efficient Crowdsourcing via Proxy Voting
  • Jakub Sliwinski, Yair Zick and Ayumi Igarashi. Statistically Stable Communities with Limited Interactions
  • Jakub Sliwinski and Yair Zick. Learning Hedonic Games
  • Karl-Dieter Crisman, Jian Cui and Min-Sun Kim. Broad Support in Two-Person Elections
  • Markus Brill and Nimrod Talmon. Pairwise Liquid Democracy
  • Max Bender, Kirk Pruhs and Alireza Samadian. Need-Aware College Admissions and the Stability of Marriage
  • Christian Saile and Warut Suksompong. Robust Bounds on Choosing from Large Tournaments
  • Georgios AmanatidisGeorgios Birmpas and Evangelos Markakis. Comparing Approximate Relaxations of Envy-Freeness
  • Elizabeth Silver, Chris Guest and Richard de Rozario. Adaptive voting aggregation for partial ballots in crowdsourcing
  • Andreas Darmann, Janosch Döcker, Britta Dorn, Jérôme Lang and Sebastian Frederik Schneckenburger. Simplified Group Activity Selection
  • Felix Brandt, Chrisitan Saile and Christian Stricker. Voting with Ties: Strong Impossibilities via SAT Solving
  • Stéphane Airiau, Haris Aziz, Ioannis Caragiannis, Justin Kruger and Jérôme Lang. Positional Social Decision Schemes: Fair and Efficient Portioning
  • Daniele PorelloNicolas TroquardRafael PenalozaRoberto Confalonieri, Pietro Galliani and Oliver Kutz. Social Mechanisms for the Collective Engineering of Ontologies
  • Manel Ayadi, Nahla Ben Amor and Jérôme Lang. The Communication Burden of Single Transferable Vote, in Practice
  • Elliot Anshelevich and Wennan Zhu. Tradeoffs Between Information and Ordinal Approximation for Bipartite Matching
  • Dorothea Baumeister, Daniel NeugebauerJörg Rothe and Hilmar Schadrack. Complexity of Verification in Incomplete Argumentation Frameworks
  • Dorothea Baumeister, Tobias Hogrebe and Lisa Rey. Generalized Distance Bribery
  • Abhijin Adiga, Chris J Kuhlman, Madhav V Marathe, S. S. Ravi, Daniel J Rosenkrantz and Richard E. Stearns. Inferring Users’ Choice Functions in Networked Social Systems Through Active Queries
  • Nicholas Mattei, Abdallah Saffidine and Toby Walsh. An Axiomatic and Empirical Analysis of Mechanisms for Online Organ Matching
  • Vijay Menon and Kate Larson. Robust and Approximately Stable Marriages under Partial Information
  • Zack Fitzsimmons, Edith Hemaspaandra, Alexander Hoover and David Narvaez. Very Hard Electoral Control Problems
  • Robert Bredereck, Piotr Faliszewski, Ayumi Igarashi, Martin Lackner and Piotr Skowron. Multiwinner Elections with Diversity Constraints
  • Omer LevReshef Meir, Svetlana Obraztsova and Maria Polukarov. Heuristic Voting as Ordinal Dominance Strategies
  • Dominik Peters. Proportionality and Strategyproofness in Multiwinner Elections
  • Ilan NehamaTaiki Todo and Makoto Yokoo. Manipulations-resistant facility location mechanisms for ZV-line graphs
  • Kumap Nahro. The Museum of Social Choice

Schedule, TBD

PC Chairs

  • Edith Elkind, University of Oxford
  • Lirong Xia, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Program Committee Members

  • Aris Filos-Ratsikas, University of Oxford
  • Katarina Cechlarova, PF UPJS Kosice
  • Palash Dey, TIFR Mumbai
  • Nimrod Talmon, Weizmann Institute of Science
  • Jörg Rothe, Universität Düsseldorf
  • Elliot Anshelevich, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
  • Robert Bredereck, TU Berlin
  • Yair Zick , National University of Singapore
  • Omer Lev, Ben-Gurion University
  • Judy Goldsmith, University of Kentucky
  • William Zwicker, Union College
  • Piotr Skowron, TU Berlin
  • Haris Aziz , Data61, CSIRO and UNSW
  • Jérôme Lang, CNRS, LAMSADE, Université Paris-Dauphine
  • Gerhard Woeginger, RWTH Aachen
  • Umberto Grandi, University of Toulouse
  • Ronald de Haan, University of Amsterdam
  • Piotr Faliszewski, AGH University of Science and Technology
  • Neeldhara Misra, Indian Institute of Technology, Gandhinagar
  • Jean-Francois Laslier, CNRS, Paris School of Economics
  • Nicholas Mattei, IBM
  • Reshef Meir, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology
  • Svetlana Obraztsova, Nangyang Technological University
  • Fuhito Kojima, Stanford University
  • Ioannis Caragiannis, University of Patras
  • Markus Brill, TU Berlin
  • Rolf Niedermeier, TU Berlin
  • Makoto Yokoo, Kyushu University
  • Peter Biro, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences
  • Nicolas Maudet, Université Pierre et Marie Curie
  • Simina Branzei, Purdue University
  • Sylvain Bouveret, LIG - Grenoble INP, Université Grenoble-Alpes
  • Dorothea Baumeister, Universität Düsseldorf
  • John P. Dickerson, University of Maryland
  • Yongjie Yang, Universität des Saarlandes
  • Felix Fischer, Queen Mary University of London
  • Vangelis Markakis, Athens University of Economics and Business

Local Organizers

Invitation letter

If you need a visa to attend COMSOC, please plan ahead and apply for B-1 visa. Invitation letters will be available upon request if you are a coauthor of accepted papers (oral or poster). Please contact Lirong Xia (xialirong@gmail.com) with the following information: your name, title, affiliation, address, and the title of your accepted paper(s).

Visa for COMSOC

Due to the recent travel ban, visa for individuals from Syria, Iraq, Iran, Yemen, Somalia, Libya, and Sudan might be limited. It is hard to predict whether individuals from other countries will be affected at the time of the workshop.

More information about visa application can be found here.

Requirements for Using the Visa Waiver Program (VWP)

Travelers in the following categories are no longer eligible to travel or be admitted to the United States under the Visa Waiver Program (VWP):

  • Nationals of VWP countries who have traveled to or been present in Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, or Yemen on or after March 1, 2011 (with limited exceptions for travel for diplomatic or military purposes in the service of a VWP country).

  • Nationals of VWP countries who are also nationals of Iran, Iraq, Sudan, or Syria.

In addition, as of April 1, 2016, you must have an e-passport to use the VWP. An e-Passport is an enhanced secure passport with an embedded electronic chip. You can readily identify an e-Passport, because it has a unique international symbol on the cover. 

For more information, see the the Visa Waiver Program Improvement and Terrorist Travel Prevention Act of 2015 on this page. U.S. Customs and Border Protection strongly recommends that any traveler to the United States check his or her  ESTA status  prior to making any travel reservations or travelling to the United States. 

Citizen or National of VWP Designated Country*

Citizens or nationals of the following countries* are currently eligible to travel to the United States under the VWP, unless citizens of one of these countries are also a national of Iraq, Iran, Syria, or Sudan. More information can be found on this page.

Andorra Hungary Norway
Australia Iceland Portugal
Austria Ireland San Marino
Belgium Italy Singapore
Brunei Japan Slovakia
Chile Latvia Slovenia
Czech Republic Liechtenstein South Korea
Denmark Lithuania Spain
Estonia Luxembourg Sweden
Finland Malta Switzerland
France Monaco Taiwan*
Germany Netherlands United Kingdom**
Greece New Zealand  

**To be eligible to travel under the VWP, British citizens must have the unrestricted right of permanent abode in England, Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland, the Channel Islands, and the Isle of Man

By Air

The nearest airport is Albany International Airport (ALB). Major US airline companies offer flights to the Albany International airport.

By Train

Albany–Rensselaer station serves 10 trains each way between Albany and New York City per day. Each trip takes about 2.5 hours. There are also at least two buses between Albany and Boston per day. Each trip takes about 3.5 hours.

From Airport/Train/Bus station to RPI

The best way is by taxi, Uber, or Lyft. Public transportation in Albany area is not very convenient.

Coming from EC-18 (Ithaca, NY)

Travelers from EC-18 may consider driving (3 hours). There are two options for public transportation (bus)

  • Option 1. book online via Wanderu. There are two trips per day, each of which takes 5.5 hours.
  • Option 2. Coach USA. No online ticket is available. The visitor must visit Ithaca bus terminal to buy the ticket. The ticket can be bought right before departure, and it is usually not full. See here for the schedule (only Ithaca bus terminal sells ticket, the other location in Ithaca does not sell tickets).

Location

The main conference venue is CBIS Auditorium and Gallery at RPI

Acommodation

Two hotels are in walking distance (see the map above). Please make your reservation directly with the hotel.

Hotels that need driving. Please make your reservation directly with the hotel.

University Accommodation

RPI provides dorm rooms at Warren Hall (5 min walk to workshop venue, see the map above) for $30.00 per night/ per person for a double room, or $39.00 per night for a single room.

  • Warren Hall is on a small stree. Google may find a wrong place.

To apply, please complete this form and email it to Shannon Carrothers (bornts@rpi.edu) and cc comsoc2018.rpi@gmail.com by June 1, 2018.

Registration Fee

Early registration (before June 1 end of day anywhere on the earth). $110 USD

Late and onsite registration (after June 1). $140 USD

Payment Methods (choose one)

Method 1. Wire Transfer.

  • Bank: Bank of America

  • Address: State Street, Albany, NY 12207

  • ABA: 026009593

  • SWIFT: BOFAUS3N

  • Account: 9429364051

  • Acct name: Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Concentration Account

  • Reference or Attn: COMSOC18 – Pamela Murarka

Then, please send an email with subject "COMSOC-18 registration via wire transfer" to Shannon Carrothers (bornts@rpi.edu) and cc comsoc2018.rpi@gmail.com. In the email body, please include your name, paid amount, any dietary restrictions, or anything you want us to know. Please do not send bank information via email.


Method 2. Credit card via fax.

Then, please send an email with subject "COMSOC-18 registration via fax" to Shannon Carrothers (bornts@rpi.edu) and cc comsoc2018.rpi@gmail.com. In the email body, please include your name, paid amount, any dietary restrictions, or anything you want us to know. Please do not send credit card information via email.

Sponsors